PUBLIC NOTICE

MAJOR DISASTER DECLARATION

FEMA 4396–DR–MP

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) hereby gives notice to the public of its intent to provide financial assistance to the Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Island (CNMI), local governments, and private nonprofit organizations under major disaster declaration FEMA-4396-DR-MP. This notice applies to the Individual Assistance (IA), Public Assistance (PA), and Hazard Mitigation Grant (HMGP) programs implemented under the authority of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, 42 U.S.C. §§ 5121-5207. This public notice concerns activities that may affect historic properties, activities that are located in or affect wetland areas and the 100- year floodplain, and may involve critical actions within the 500-year floodplain. Such activities may adversely affect the historic property, floodplain or wetland, or may result in continuing vulnerability to flood damage. 

 

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Chemical Threat Print E-mail

A chemical attack is the deliberate release of a toxic gas, liquid, or solid that can poison people and the environment. Possible signs of a chemical attack are:

  • Many people suffering from watery eyes, twitching, choking, having trouble breathing or losing coordination.
  • Many sick or dead birds, fish, or other small animals are also a cause for suspicion.


If you observe signs of a chemical attack: Find clean air quickly.

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Chemical Threat Visual Guide

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Source: Ready.gov

  • Immediately try to define the impacted area or where the chemical is coming from, if possible.
  • Take immediate action to get away.
  • If the chemical is inside a building where you are, evacuate the building immediately without passing through the contaminated area, if possible.
  • If you are unable to evacuate the building or find clean air without passing through the contaminated area, it may be better to move as far away as possible and shelter-in-place.
  • If you are outside, quickly decide what is the fastest way to find clean, uncontaminated air. Consider if you can evacuate the area or if your should go inside a nearby building and shelter-in-place.

If you think you have been exposed to a chemical:

If your eyes are watering, your skin is stinging, and you are having trouble breathing, you may have been exposed to a chemical.

  • If you think you may have been exposed to a chemical, strip immediately and wash.
  • Look for a hose, fountain, or any source of water, and wash with soap if possible, being sure not to scrub the chemical into your skin.
  • Seek emergency medical attention.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: http://www.ready.gov

 

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Ready America

Federal Emergency Management Agency

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